Same Face, New Place

Every 18 year old kid has to make major life decisions. One of the biggest decisions kids this age have to make where to attend college. At 18 years old some student athletes do make mistakes when it comes to their college choice and end up looking for a new academic and athletic instituion. This is where the college transfer system comes into play. In fact, a study published in a 2010 New York Times article shows that about 1 in every 3 students enrolled in an University in the United States transfer at some point during their education, and this trend can be seen in the world of college basketball. In recent years, the amount of transfer players has increased significantly in division 1 college basketball, and this year should be no different. Here are a few old faces that have wound up in new places for the 2015-2016 college basketball season.

Mychal Mulder (Vincennes –> Kentucky)
Kentucky is primed for yet another successful year in the SEC with additions such as Mulder. Kentucky was able to pull Mulder away from Creighton, Wichita State, Louisville, Minnesota, and Missouri. Coach Calipari praised Mulder for being a great fit for a program which has become known for relying on freshman with little experience. Mulder will be able to add some experience to Kentucky’s rotation.  Mulder was a Junior College All American and the 13th ranked JUCO transfer at a very successful Vincennes University in Indiana. At 6’4” and 184 pounds, he has perfect 2 guard size and looks extremely smooth on the court. He averaged 16 points a game as a sophomore which makes him a good addition to the Kentucky roster. Mulder should certainly compete for a starting spot at Kentucky and has real potential to impact any game he is in with his 46% 3 point shooting percentage.

Eron Harris (West Virginia –> Michigan State)
Two years ago, Eron Harris was an impact player on a very talented West Virginia team under Bob Huggins. Averaging 17.2 points a game in Morgantown as a Sophmore, Harris was one of the most dynamic young players in the very tough Big 12. His flashy style of play supposedly caused him to butt heads with head coach, Bob Huggins, which ultimately resulted in his departure from West Virginia. Harris spent last season on the scout team for Michigan State due to ineligibility to play. He now has experience working in Tom Izzo’s system. Now at Michigan State, Harris is supposed to be a star for Tom Izzo’s Spartans this season. However, his future is currently up in the air due to a July 1th arrest in which Harris was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated. He has been suspended indefinitely from the program, and there is currently no word as to when he will be allowed to participate in team activities again. If Harris is allowed to return, expect him to become one of the most prolific scorers in the country for Michigan State this season.

Rasheed Sulaimon (Duke –> Maryland)
As Duke made their run to an NCAA tournament championship last season, one member of their opening day roster was nowhere to be found. And that member was Rasheed Sulaimon. After being accused of sexual assault, Sulaimon was released from Duke’s basketball program in January of his senior season. In doing so, Sulaimon became the first player to ever be kicked off the team by Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski. Although dismissed from the team, Sulaimon was able to graduate from Duke last May, therefore, he is eligible to transfer and play this season. That is how he ended up at Maryland for the 2015-2016 season. Sulaimon will look to fill the void left by Dez Well’s graduation. Already considered a national championship contender, Maryland only gets stronger with the addition of Sulaimon as a 2 guard in the starting lineup next to Trimble and Layman. Expect big things from Maryland this season with Rasheed Sulaimon playing a big role in this success.

Max Bielfeldt (Michigan –> Indiana)
Indiana was able to pick up some interior experience with the transfer of fifth year senior Max Bielfeldt into the program. While this looks like a relatively minor signing for the Hoosiers, this  may prove to be significant for a team that just released two key bigs from the program due to marijuana possession. Bielfeldt is not a high volume scorer by any means, but he is one of those guys who is willing to do anything to help the team win. He will add some much needed post defense and depth behind McDonald’s All-American freshman Thomas Bryant. Indiana fans have high hopes for their team this season, and hopefully Bielfeldt is able to contribute to a successful season in Bloomington.

Seth Allen (Maryland –> Virginia Tech)
Remember this name? The best player from a decent 2013-2014 Maryland basketball team who surprisingly left the program after his sophomore season is now gearing up for his junior season as a Virginia Tech Hokie. After Maryland’s surprising success last season and expected success in the upcoming season, Seth Allen is the last thing on the average college basketball fans mind. But after averaging 14 points a game two years ago and having a year of rest and training under his belt, Seth Allen may be primed to make an significant impact in the ACC this season. Virginia Tech will rely heavily on Allen this season after struggling in Buzz Williams first season. Don’t be surprised if you start hearing the name Seth Allen in the college basketball news once again this season.

 

Jake Eisner 

Virginia Tech ’18

 

 

Sources:
http://www.aseaofblue.com/2015-basketball-recruiting/2015/4/28/8510125/juco-all-american-mychal-mulder-is-a-kentucky-wildcat
http://www.sbnation.com/college-basketball/2015/7/7/8910111/eron-harris-suspended-drunk-driving-arrest-michigan-state
http://www.sbnation.com/college-basketball/2015/5/11/8586103/dismissed-duke-guard-rasheed-sulaimon-is-transferring-to-maryland
http://www.indystar.com/story/sports/college/indiana/2015/06/02/max-bielfeldt-transfer-forward-michigan-commits-to-indiana-hoosiers/28380783/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/hokies-will-count-on-former-maryland-guard-seth-allen-even-as-he-sits-out/2014/10/13/d80ba208-5315-11e4-892e-602188e70e9c_story.html

Jacob Eisner ’18

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